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Top Click of 2013 on Women Walking Wisely: “What Does Real Trust Look Like?”

woman with magnifying glassI want the real thing.  Nothing fake.  Nothing counterfeit.  Just the real thing.

Unfortunately, I rarely can afford the real thing . . .  I don’t wear designer clothes.  My wedding ring contains the only diamond I own.  My beauty regimen consists of cheap products from Target–no fancy name-brand cosmetics here.

There is one thing I cannot afford to have if it is counterfeit:  Trust.  Specifically, trust in God.  I can’t afford fake trust.

I have tried fake trust before.  It has looked like this:  I encounter a trial.  I say the appropriate Christian cliche to myself or others, “I trust the Lord.”  Then, I quickly fall into worry, anger, demands to get  my own way, hurtful responses towards those I love, and self-protecting solutions–all which compound my problems.  Sound familiar?  Probably.

The problem with this kind of trust is that it always fails.  My faith falters.  Peace eludes me.  I make sinful choices.  Why?  This trust fails because regardless of what I say, the object of the trust is ME, and I will fail me every time.  The object of my trust must be GOD, and GOD ALONE.  Apart from Him, I will never walk wisely and victoriously through suffering.

Throughout the Scriptures, we see that biblical trust is active reliance on the one true God.  Think of Noah, Abraham, Joseph, Moses, Joshua, and Ruth.  Consider Samuel, David, Elijah, Daniel, and Esther.  Remember Mary, John the Baptist, Peter, Mary Magdalene, Stephen, and Paul.  These are just a few of those who have gone before us, walking wisely in this world by not trusting God merely with their WORDS, but with their ACTIONS.  Their trust was genuine.

Genuine biblical trust is a combination of knowledge, belief, attitude, and action:  Knowledge of the character of God, Belief in the truthfulness of who God is and what He is like, an Attitude of humble confidence in the Lord, and the Action of submitting to God’s care–“casting all your anxiety upon the Lord, because He cares for you.” (I Peter 5:7)

“So,” you may be asking, “HOW am I to ‘cast’ my cares on the Lord?  HOW am I to respond to a trustworthy God?  What does trusting God look like in every day life?” 

To answer these questions, I encourage you to read and print the following list, and then put it somewhere you will see it regularly.  When you find your mind wandering (or marching) down the path of worry and despair, turn around and follow this path of active trust as you “take every thought captive to the obedience of Christ”  (II Corinthians 10:5):

1.  Acknowledge and believe the truth about God’s character.  Recount the attributes of God.  Remember His deeds of faithfulness throughout the Scriptures, in your own life, and in the lives of people you know.  Literally list all the ways that He has been faithful.  In prayer, begin thanking Him for who He is and what He has done.  If in your distress you are unable to do this, pray the Psalms.  “Be still, and know that I am God.” (Psalm 46:10)

2.  Confess your unbelief and lack of trust in Him.  Admit to the Lord your lack of trust.  Ask Him to forgive you for your unbelief, worry, fear, anger, etc.  Find rest and comfort in His promise that “if we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.”  (I John 1:9)

3.  Cry out to God for help.  Ask your Heavenly Father for a steadfast heart that is loyal to Him despite your circumstances; “Unite my heart to fear your name.” (Psalm 86:11)  Also, pray that He will move in your situation in very specific ways; “In everything, by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God.” (Philippians 4:6)  

4.  Rely on the encouragement that comes from Scripture.  Read the Word.  Listen to it.  Memorize it.  Think on it.  You will be renewed as your mind is transformed by God’s Word.   His promises are the lifeblood for strengthening your faint heart.  If you are at the point at which you don’t know where to turn in the Bible, read any of the Psalms, stopping to think and pray through the verses that encourage you in your situation.  “My soul weeps because of grief; Strengthen me according to your Word.” (Psalm 119:32)

5.  Obey God’s revealed will in Scripture.  If God has given a command or a principle in Scripture that applies to your situation, then obey it.  Glorify the Lord in your life by doing what He commands.  Accept God’s wisdom, even if it is hard or doesn’t make sense to you.  Obey His Word, and leave the results to Him.  “Obey my voice, and I will be your God, and you will be My people, and you will walk in all the way which I command you, that it may be well with you.” (Jeremiah 7: 23)

6.  Focus your attention on God and the eternal.  Focus . . . refocus . . . and focus again.  We are creatures of habit who often return to trusting ourselves and focusing on our troubles.  If that is where you find yourself, walk again through this path of trust that I have outlined.  Trusting God wholeheartedly takes practice!  Direct your attention to the unseen:  who God is, what He has done, His promises, His commands, His salvation, His glory that awaits you, and His very presence today.  ”Set your mind on the things above, not on the things that are on earth.  For you have died and your life is hidden with Christ in God.” (Colossians 3:2-3)

Fully trusting God in the midst of our troubles can seem like an impossibility, especially when our trials appear insurmountable and our own weaknesses seem over-powering.  But, God does not command us to do anything that He will not give the grace, strength, and ability to accomplish.  “God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in time of trouble.”  (Psalm 46:1)   

Lean hard on Him.  He will not fail you.

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Love Divine

Timeline-Of-Napoleon-BonaparteI experienced a rather strange convergence this week:  Napoleon, Ravi Zacharias, and I John.  Huh?  I’ll explain.

First, yesterday my twins were having a discussion in the back seat of our van about . . . Napoleon.  Really?  Yes.  It started with, “Mommy, is Napoleon in heaven?”  The other jumped in, “Of course not!!  He was a horrible man and left his army in Egypt!”  Really?  Yes, he did.

Second, last night I told my husband about the kids’ conversation and he directed me to the following quote about Christ by Napoleon found in Ravi Zacharias’ book Jesus Among Other Gods (p. 149).  I’ll include it in a moment, but for now, on to I John.

Third, this morning during our family devotions we were in I John and discussing love–the love of God for us which leads to our love for others.  “Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God; and everyone who loves is born of God and knows God.  The one who does not love does not know God, for God is love.  By this the love of God was manifested in us, that God has sent his only begotten Son into the world so that we might live through Him.  In this is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent His Son to be the propitiaion for our sins.  Beloved, if God so loved us, we also ought to love one another” (I John 4:7-11).  It is the love of God that saves us from the penalty and rule of sin.  In Christ, we are now free to sacrificially love as He has loved us.

So, back to Napoleon . . .

After a lifetime of seeking to conquer the world with an iron fist, Napoleon realized that his conquests–and the means of his conquests–were infinitely inferior to Christ’s conquest of humanity through Divine Love.  Napoleon was right, Jesus rules like no other Man for Jesus loves like no other Man.

When exiled on the rock of St. Helena, Napoleon called Count Montholon to his side and asked him, “Can you tell me who Jesus Christ was?” The count declined to answer, and Napoleon responded,

Well then, I will tell you. Alexander, Caesar, Charlemagne and I myself have founded great empires; but upon what did these creations of our genius depend? Upon force. Jesus alone founded His empire upon love, and to this very day millions will die for Him. I think I understand something of human nature; and I tell you, all these were men, and I am a man: none else is like Him; Jesus Christ was more than a man. I have inspired multitudes with such an enthusiastic devotion that they would have died for me but to do this it was necessary that I should be visibly present with the electric influence of my looks, my words, of my voice. When I saw men and spoke to them, I lighted up the flame of self-devotion in their hearts. Christ alone has succeeded in so raising the mind of man toward the unseen, that it becomes insensible to the barriers of time and space. Across a chasm of eighteen hundred years, Jesus Christ makes a demand which is beyond all others difficult to satisfy; He asks for that which a philosopher may often seek in vain at the hands of his friends, or a father of his children, or a bride of her spouse, or a man of his brother. He asks for the human heart; He will have it entirely to Himself. He demands it unconditionally; and forthwith His demand is granted. Wonderful! In defiance of time and space, the soul of man, with all its powers and faculties, becomes an annexation to the empire of Christ. All who sincerely believe in Him, experience that remarkable, supernatural love toward Him. This phenomenon is unaccountable; it is altogether beyond the scope of man’s creative powers. Time, the great destroyer, is powerless to extinguish this sacred flame; time can neither exhaust its strength nor put a limit to its range. This is it, which strikes me most; I have often thought of it. This it is which proves to me quite convincingly the Divinity of Jesus Christ.

Reread.  Think.  And ponder the love of our Great God.